Rogelio "Roger" Rodriguez

Rogelio has 14 years of experience conducting ecological studies of wildlife, especially bats, throughout the United States, Canada, both Central and South America for various academic, government, and industry organizations.  Previous studies focused generally on documenting the distributions of species and their critical habitats using field surveys and computer modeling methods.  He has extensive experience in performing acoustic recording and analysis of bat echolocation using Anabat, Pettersson, and Binary Acoustic Technology systems and has documented the calls of free-flying bats throughout most of the United States and at international localities such as Argentina, Honduras, and Curacao.   

 

Rogelio has been involved with wind and wildlife issues since 2004 in which he assisted in the first collaborative effort between Bat Conservation International and Florida Power & Light (FPL) to study behavioral interactions between bats and wind turbines at the FPL Mountaineer Wind Energy Center, West Virginia. His participation in this project included observation of bat activity and interactions near operating wind turbines using infrared thermal imaging cameras and ultrasonic detectors.

 

Rogelio also has experience in mapping and spatial analysis including the use of geographic information systems (GIS) to model species distributions, delineate habitats, quantify biodiversity and species richness patterns, predict areas of conservation priority, and classify land cover from remote sensing imagery.  He has used this mapping experience to model areas with high wind potential in western Texas with the least adverse effect on bat species. He currently provides consultation to the wind industry by performing bat acoustic monitoring at a number of pre-construction sites.

 

 

Rogelio has a BS in Biology from Texas Wesleyan University in Fort Worth, Texas, an MS in Biology from Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas, and a certificate in Spatial Information Systems (GIS) from the University of Texas at Arlington.

 

Acoustic monitoring using both an Anabat and Pettersson system in Portal, Arizona.